2013 Biggin Church Ruins

Biggin Church Ruins are the remains of the Parish Church of St. John’s Berkeley, founded by Act of Assembly November 30, 1706. The church was established by an act of the South Carolina Commons House of Assembly in 1706, which divided the colony into ten parishes.

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Biggin Church Ruins are the remains of the Parish Church of St. John’s Berkeley, founded by Act of Assembly November 30, 1706. The church was established by an act of the South Carolina Commons House of Assembly in 1706, which divided the colony into ten parishes.

The original Biggin Church was probably completed in 1712 and named for a nearby creek. The local Anglican church for heroes of the American Revolution, William Moultrie and Henry Laurens, who both had plantations nearby, Biggin Church was burned by a forest fire in 1755 and rebuilt in 1761. The ruin we find today is of the building of 1761 as it was restored after the 1781 burning during the Revolutionary War.

Used by the British to store ammunition, British Col. John Coats ordered the building and its contents burned as he retreated toward Charles Town in July of that year.

The church was used until the end of the Confederacy. During the Confederate War the interior was stripped of pews and fixtures. About 1886 the unused building was again burned and damaged beyond repair by a forest fire.

The church was a rectangular brick building about 30 ft. by 60 ft. Originally done in English bond, currently, only two walls remain. One wall was probably the main entrance. It has a large portal that is flanked by two arched windows on the left and on the right. The other wall is the end of the church with a door flanked by windows on the left and right.

The original Church Cemetery is still in use today and contains the grave of Sir John Colleton III, the great grandson of the Lord Proprietor.

Biggin Church was included in the National Register of Historic Places on December 13, 1977.